Interior Design

Nature of Work

Interior designers draw upon many disciplines to enhance the function, safety, and aesthetics of interior spaces. Their main concerns are with how different colors, textures, furniture, lighting, and space work together to meet the needs of a building's occupants. Designers plan interior spaces of almost every type of building, including offices, airport terminals, theaters, shopping malls, restaurants, hotels, schools, hospitals, and private residences. Good design can boost office productivity, increase sales, attract a more affluent clientele, provide a more relaxing hospital stay, or increase a building's market value.

Interior designers must be able to read construction documents, understand building and fire codes, and know how to make space accessible to people who are disabled. Designers frequently collaborate with architects, electricians, and building contractors to ensure that designs are safe and meet construction requirements. Depending on the complexity of the project, the designer also might submit drawings for approval by a construction inspector to ensure that the design meets building codes. If a project requires structural work, the designer works with an architect or engineer for that part of the project. Most designs also require the hiring of contractors to do technical work, such as lighting, plumbing, and electrical wiring. Often designers choose contractors and write work contracts.

Career Outlook

Interior designers held about 58,900 jobs nationally in 2014, with approximately 25 percent being self-employed. The industries that employed the most interior designers in 2012 were as follows:

Employment of interior designers is expected to grow 4 percent from 2014 through 2024.

Learn more about our Interior Design program

Credentials You Can Earn

Associate Degree
Interior Design


Diploma
Interior Design


TCC
Interior Design Color Consultant


TCC
Interior Design Sales Consultant


TCC
Interior Design Technology


TCC
Interiors Specifier


TCC
Kitchen and Bath Designer



Program Expenses

The Higher Education Act requires all colleges and universities to notify students and prospective students of all program costs for which they will be responsible. Students will be responsible for the following expenses:

Admissions Fees

  • Nonrefundable application fee ($25)

Semester Fees

  • Tuition ($89 per credit hour)
  • Accident Insurance Fee ($4 per term)
  • Campus Supply Fee ($40 per term)
  • Instruction Fee ($55 per term)
  • Parking Fee ($20 per term)
  • Campus Safety Fee ($25 per term)
  • Registration Fee ($50 per term)
  • Student Activity Fee ($30 per term)
  • Technology Fee ($105 per term)

Throughout the Program

  • Textbooks (Approximately $2,475 for the associate degree program and $1,850 for the diploma program)
  • Supply Fees (Varies — See course descriptions for exact amounts)

These expenses are based on costs in effect at the time this catalog was published. Prices are subject to change.

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Faculty

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Phillip Myer, Program Chair
Office Location: J-205
Phone: (706) 355-5059
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